Next month, a contentious declaration is expected to be made by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), stating that aspartame, a commonly used sweetener found in products like Diet Coke, has the potential to cause cancer. This announcement is likely to trigger a heated dispute between industry representatives and regulatory bodies. The IARC’s classification, if implemented, may lead to legal battles, consumer concerns, and pressure on manufacturers to reformulate their products and seek alternative sweeteners. However, it’s important to note that the IARC’s evaluation does not consider safe consumption levels for individuals, as that responsibility lies with the Joint WHO and Food and Agriculture Organization’s Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA) and national regulators.

Diet Cock News

 

Is Diet Cock Bad For You? WHO Issues Alert For Consumers

JECFA is also conducting a review of aspartame this year and will announce its findings on the same day as the IARC’s decision—July 14. Since 1981, JECFA has maintained that aspartame is safe within acceptable daily intake limits. This perspective has been widely supported by national regulators worldwide, including those in the United States and Europe.

While the IARC’s and JECFA’s conclusions are currently confidential, they are considered complementary, with the IARC’s assessment representing the initial step in understanding the potential carcinogenicity of a substance. On the other hand, JECFA’s role is to conduct risk assessments, evaluating the probability of specific harm, such as cancer, occurring under certain exposure conditions and levels.

However, concerns have been raised by industry representatives and regulators who worry that conducting both processes concurrently may confuse them. Some experts from the French National Institute for Health and Medical Research and Sorbonne Paris Nord University have analyzed data and suggested a potential increased risk of breast cancer and obesity-related cancers associated with aspartame. However, previous large-scale studies on humans have found no such link, and UK experts have stated that no causal relationship has been established. Additionally, a study published last December indicated a correlation between aspartame consumption and anxiety in mice.


Discover more from industrialfront

Subscribe to get the latest posts to your email.

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *